enes
×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 738

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

miss-usa baid

Newly crowned Miss USA Nia Sanchez, a fourth-degree black belt in the Korean martial art of taekwondo, says that women need to be able to defend themselves as a way to battle the problem of campus rape and that bringing awareness to the issue is very important.

The 24-year-old from Las Vegas, Nevada, beat out 50 other contestants from all the states and the District of Columbia on Sunday night for the title of 63rd Miss USA.

First runner-up was Miss North Dakota Audra Mari. Sanchez will go on to represent the U.S. at the Miss Universe competition later this year.

In a vibrant red floor-length fishtail gown, Miss Nevada answered judge Rumer Willis’ question about the high rate of sexual assaults on college campuses.

Willis, the 25-year-old daughter of Bruce Willis and Demi Moore, said 19 percent of U.S. undergraduate women are victims of sexual assault and asked Sanchez why she thinks the issue is being swept under the rug and what should be done about it.

Sanchez said women need to take it upon themselves to learn how to defend themselves. After being crowned, Sanchez told reporters she lived for a time in a women’s shelter at a young age with her mother and at age 8 took up taekwondo to learn self-defense and build up her confidence.

As an adult, she has volunteered at women’s shelters, teaching residents how to defend themselves and teaching kids about “stranger danger.”

“I relate to them on a personal level because I’ve been there myself,” she said, adding that she plans to take her passion and knowledge for martial arts to the masses as Miss USA.

Sanchez, of German and Mexican descent, also said she was “so proud to bring the title of Miss USA back to Nevada.” “I’m so excited,” she said. “It’s a dream come true.”

Erin Brady, of South Glastonbury, Connecticut, the 2013 winner, gave up her crown to Sanchez after a three-hour telecast from the Baton Rouge Civic Center in Louisiana.

Besides Mari, the next four runners-up, judged on interviews, evening gowns and swimsuits were: Miss Georgia Tiana Griggs, Miss Louisiana Brittany Guidry, Miss Florida Brittany Oldehoff and Miss Iowa Carlyn Bradarich. All the titles included USA after the state.

Bradarich got a second chance when the viewing audience gave her the most votes on Twitter in the pageant’s first-ever “Save the Queen” option.

The subject of sexual assault was also on the mind of Miss Pennsylvania Valerie Gatto. She made headlines this week when she said she was the product of rape.

During a taped segment that aired when her name was called, Gatto said her mother was 19 when she was attacked leaving work in Pittsburgh and became pregnant.

Gatto said she is living proof “that your circumstances do not define your life.”

First runner-up Mari said she overcame being bullied in high school by competing in ice hockey. The Fargo, North Dakota, native wore a green floor-length evening gown and in her final interview talked about the importance of getting an education and going to college.

Contestants entered the stage on a glitzy float as Louisiana native singer-songwriter Marc Broussard sang the New Orleans hits “Iko Iko” and “Hey Pocky Way” to kick off the 2014 contest.

The women introduced themselves while holding Mardi Gras masks in their hands as purple, green and gold confetti fell in the background.

The pageant also included musical acts by the country music duo Florida Georgia Line, rapper Nelly and Latin pop band Camila.

Celebrity judges walked a red carpet in evening gowns and tuxedos before the start of the show, posing for pictures and talking about the qualities they would be looking for in the beauty they crown the winner.

“It’s very important that she has confidence,” said Barbara Palacios, Miss Universe 1986 and a coach and judge for the new Telemundo reality show, “Miss Latina Universo.” ”The right attitude and perseverance are also very important.”

“It’s all about the eyes,” said Lance Bass of the pop singing boy group NSYNC. “I just want to see a girl that is just really having a good time up there.”

Donald Trump, who owns the Miss Universe Organization, which includes the Miss USA pageant, also walked the red carpet.

Miss USA 2014

[readon1 url="http://voxxi.com/2014/06/09/miss-usa-nia-sanchez/"]Source:voxxi.com[/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

boy6Never underestimate first-graders.

Jonah Pournazarian, 7, is best friends with Dylan Siegel, 6. Jonah has been diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type 1B , a rare liver disorder that doesn’t have a cure. Dylan decided to raise money for research to help his friend. Late last fall, he hatched a plan and approached his parents.

“We said, ‘Let’s do a lemonade stand, the typical thing,’” David Siegel, Dylan’s dad, told ABCNews.com. “He looked at us and said, ‘I want to write a book.’”

After just two months on the market, sales of the handwritten and illustrated book and chocolate bars have raised $30,000 and counting, David Siegel said.

Now Dylan’s goal is $1 million, his father said.

The 16-page book “Chocolate Bar,” uses the term to mean “cool.” “Disneyland is so chocolate bar,” the book starts out. Theht-dylan-nt-13 ending? “I like to help my friends. That is the biggest chocolate bar.”

Jonah’s parents, who live in Los Angeles, set up a fund for their son six years ago that has raised $400,000, but now, “Chocolate Bar” looks set to exceed that sum, his father, Rabin Pournazarian, told ABCNews.com.

Whole Foods has donated hundreds of chocolate bars.  A local Barnes & Noble bookstore hosted a book signing that drew 200 people, Dylan’s father said. People from states including Tennessee and Missouri have donated money to the cause via Facebook and a website. The boys appeared on CBS television show “The Doctors” last week, pinching each others’ cheeks as they told their story.

Jonah’s genetic condition afflicts one in a million children, his father said. Most days all he eats is cornstarch mixed with chicken soup with vegetables that his mother makes and feeds him through a tube, his father said.

His feeding schedule is sensitive — the couple keeps an alarm in the bedroom set for 3:30 a.m., his father said. At school, Jonah’s parents have had to ask parents of other children to keep their child home if they get sick or to at least notify Jonah’s parents so they can keep him home.

“What could be a common cold … will land Jonah in the hospital for five to six days,” his father said. “It happened last month.”

Jonah was diagnosed with his illness when he was a baby and suffered from night sweats and low blood sugar, his father said. The existing fund has been “very grassroots” and mostly friends and family have contributed to it, Rabin Pournazarian said.

Jonah, who has a fraternal twin brother Eli who does not suffer from the condition, “gets the importance of finding a cure as much as a 7-year-old can,” his father said. “He doesn’t want his (feeding) tube forever.”

The money from the fund and book and chocolate sales have been sent to the University of Florida School of Medicine in Gainsville where research is taking place under Dr. David Weinstein, who is working with 200 families, he said.

It’s the first time the rare disease has gotten national attention, Pournazarian said.

Jonah and his family couldn’t be happier.

“We never dreamed that this was going to happen,” David Siegel said. “It’s just  struck a nerve and now we don’t want to stop until we’ve hit our mission.

Never underestimate first-graders.

Jonah Pournazarian, 7, is best friends with Dylan Siegel, 6. Jonah has been diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type 1B , a rare liver disorder that doesn’t have a cure. Dylan decided to raise money for research to help his friend. Late last fall, he hatched a plan and approached his parents.

“We said, ‘Let’s do a lemonade stand, the typical thing,’” David Siegel, Dylan’s dad, told ABCNews.com. “He looked at us and said, ‘I want to write a book.’”

After just two months on the market, sales of the handwritten and illustrated book and chocolate bars have raised $30,000 and counting, David Siegel said.

Now Dylan’s goal is $1 million, his father said.

The 16-page book “Chocolate Bar,” uses the term to mean “cool.” “Disneyland is so chocolate bar,” the book starts out. The ending? “I like to help my friends. That is the biggest chocolate bar.”

Jonah’s parents, who live in Los Angeles, set up a fund for their son six years ago that has raised $400,000, but now, “Chocolate Bar” looks set to exceed that sum, his father, Rabin Pournazarian, told ABCNews.com.

Whole Foods has donated hundreds of chocolate bars.  A local Barnes & Noble bookstore hosted a book signing that drew 200 people, Dylan’s father said. People from states including Tennessee and Missouri have donated money to the cause via Facebook and a website. The boys appeared on CBS television show “The Doctors” last week, pinching each others’ cheeks as they told their story.

Jonah’s genetic condition afflicts one in a million children, his father said. Most days all he eats is cornstarch mixed with chicken soup with vegetables that his mother makes and feeds him through a tube, his father said.

His feeding schedule is sensitive — the couple keeps an alarm in the bedroom set for 3:30 a.m., his father said. At school, Jonah’s parents have had to ask parents of other children to keep their child home if they get sick or to at least notify Jonah’s parents so they can keep him home.

“What could be a common cold … will land Jonah in the hospital for five to six days,” his father said. “It happened last month.”

Jonah was diagnosed with his illness when he was a baby and suffered from night sweats and low blood sugar, his father said. The existing fund has been “very grassroots” and mostly friends and family have contributed to it, Rabin Pournazarian said.

Jonah, who has a fraternal twin brother Eli who does not suffer from the condition, “gets the importance of finding a cure as much as a 7-year-old can,” his father said. “He doesn’t want his (feeding) tube forever.”

The money from the fund and book and chocolate sales have been sent to the University of Florida School of Medicine in Gainsville where research is taking place under Dr. David Weinstein, who is working with 200 families, he said.

It’s the first time the rare disease has gotten national attention, Pournazarian said.

Jonah and his family couldn’t be happier.

“We never dreamed that this was going to happen,” David Siegel said. “It’s just  struck a nerve and now we don’t want to stop until we’ve hit our mission.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Crown Prince Felipe-180x252Spain’s crown prince will be proclaimed King Felipe VI on June 18 before Parliament in Madrid, legislative officials said Tuesday.

The 46-year-old Felipe de Borbon, who currently holds the title of Prince of Asturias, will succeed his father, King Juan Carlos, who announced on Monday that he was abdicating.

The body that manages legislation in the lower house of Parliament introduced the bill making King Juan Carlos de Borbon’s abdication official on Tuesday afternoon.

Under Spanish law, Parliament must approve legislation governing the succession process for the Crown.

The succession law is expected to be approved by the lower house of Parliament next week, with the Senate likely following suit on June 17.

The constitutional mechanisms for the succession will be activated once the law is published in the Official Bulletin of the State, or BOE, and Prince Felipe will then be proclaimed king before Parliament.

The one-article document, which has two sections, states that King Juan Carlos I is abdicating the Crown of Spain and the move will “produce an automatic succession, following the order established in the Constitution.”

The proclamation of Felipe VI as king of Spain will be carried out before a joint session of the two houses of Parliament.

King Juan Carlos and Crown Prince Felipe on Tuesday made their first public appearance together since the monarch announced that he was abdicating in favor of his son.

The Spanish monarch and his son participated in a military ceremony at the San Lorenzo de El Escorial Monastery that was attended by the army and air force commanders.

King Juan Carlos and Crown Prince Felipe, both wearing military uniforms, arrived at the monastery as a large crowd of tourists and residents looked on, with many people shouting “Long live the king!”

The Spanish monarch said Monday he was abdicating in favor of his son after nearly 39 years on the throne.

“Today, a younger generation deserves to move to the forefront, with new energy, committed to carrying out the transformations and reforms that the current situation demands with determination,” the king said, referring to Felipe, the Prince of Asturias.

King Juan Carlos said he began preparing to step down in January, when he turned 76.

Juan Carlos ascended to the throne on Nov. 22, 1975, and his son, Felipe de Borbon, became Prince of Asturias, the title held by the heir to the Spanish Crown, in January 1977.


[readon1 url="http://www.hispanicallyspeakingnews.com/latino-daily-news/details/prince-felipe-ascends-to-spanish-throne-on-june-18/30143/"]Source:www.hispanicallyspeakingnews.com[/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

r-ELEPHANT-IVORY-large570Hong Kong authorities said Friday that they had confiscated $1.4 million worth of ivory that arrived smuggled in a shipping container from Africa, the second large seizure of tusks at the busy port in the past month.

Customs officials discovered the 1,330 kilograms (about 2,900 pounds) of illegal ivory Thursday in a container from Tanzania that was marked as carrying sunflower seeds, authorities said.

The 569 tusks, worth 10.56 million Hong Kong dollars (about $1.4 million U.S.), were in the back of the container, buried under hundreds of bags of the seeds.

The Hong Kong government said customs officials are investigating the case and are still trying to find "the smuggling syndicate members." The container had been picked out for inspection based on "risk assessment," authorities said.
Poaching on the rise in Africa

The seizure follows the roughly $3.4 million worth in ivory found in two shipping containers last month, one of the largest amounts ever seized in Hong Kong.

Those containers arrived from Tanzania and Kenya, according to Hong Kong customs officials. The agency seized 1,209 pieces of ivory tusks and 3 pounds of ivory ornaments from the two containers, discovered over a period of two days.

In that case, Hong Kong customs officials were on alert after a tip-off from officials in Guangdong, China.


Seven people, including one Hong Kong resident, were arrested by Chinese officials in connection with the case, authorities said at the time.

Hong Kong is viewed as a transit point for the illegal ivory trade, feeding into increasing demands in China, according to a Time article published last month.

Elephants are being killed in Africa at an alarming rate as international demand soars for ivory. Much of the demand comes from increasingly affluent Asian countries, particularly China and Thailand.

Before this year, the most recent major bust in Hong Kong occurred in 2011, when officials seized a shipment of ivory and rhinoceros horns valued at $2.2 million Hong Kong dollars.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

facebookSheryl Sandberg is a role model, say her defenders. The chief operating officer of Facebook earned two degrees from Harvard and spent the early part of her career in public service, rising to become chief of staff to Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers during the latter days of the Clinton administration.

She helped build Google into a powerhouse; she has led the Facebook team in making the social media site ubiquitous. New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd recently touted her as a potential candidate for national office.

And she's a mother who cares deeply about work-life balance and has been outspoken about women pulling together. It's that last part that's the problem, writes Mona Charen in National Review.

Charen takes issue with Sandberg's book, Lean In, which encourages women to stop sabotaging their own professional success by pushing harder in the workplace. Sandberg should instead be encouraging working women to return home and focus on being good mothers.

"Isn't it odd that people who exhort us to increase the number of women in powerful, high-paying jobs, on the speculative grounds that this will be good for the world, discount the roles of women as mothers, which are (usually) of undeniable benefit to their kids?" Charen writes. "Many women have figured this out. One put it this way: 'The world will not be affected one way or another if it has one more accountant during the next decade. But my kids will be profoundly affected by having me raise them.'"

She adds, "Many women also find that devoting their time to raising happy, ethical, and responsible children is more rewarding than spending 60 hours a week at the office. Why should they be made to feel that they are letting down the team?"

[readon1 url="http://politix.topix.com/homepage/5067-facebook-chief-should-have-stayed-home-with-the-kids"]Source:politix.topix.com[/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

RL"Look," Ralph Lauren says, "I’m in the fashion business, but I’m not in the fashion business." We are sitting by a king-size coffee table in his souvenir-strewn office as the impatient honks of yellow cabs echo faintly up from the New York street below. Alarm bells are ringing, too. What on earth is this Bronx-born billionaire personification of one of the world’s biggest fashion brands on about? Even without a speck of due diligence I’d know that after 46 years Ralph Lauren is America’s alpha-designer: 500-and-something shops in 80 countries, 23,000 employees, 15 (at my last count) separate sub-brands, revenues of $6.9 billion last year alone – and that mallet-swinging Polo player logo, for heaven’s sake. If anybody is "in" the fashion business, then surely it is this diminutive (5ft 6in, according to Vogue) but wiry 74-year-old.

Lauren expands. "What I think is cool is the expression of yourself. That’s what’s cool. Take you, if you’d walked in today wearing some 'outfit' then you wouldn’t look like you. But your dark coat, your scarf around your neck, your shirt – you look like a writer. You look like you. You’re classical but you’re cool. And you’re in the fashion business too. Your clothes are your statement about who you are. And I’m sure you thought it, right?"

Whoa, Ralph Lauren is interviewing me. And trowelling on the flattery as he does it. But he’s also illustrating the idiosyncrasy that makes Lauren so appealing to millions of people who don’t give two hoots about the cult of fashion. Where other designers try to impose an aesthetic on the wearer, Lauren indulges his fantasies, observes his audience then provides them with the tools to share the fantasy. When it comes to mustering a palette of reference he is highly promiscuous: Navajo print and prairie cowboy denim, aviation, safari, field sports, flappers, Tsarist Russia and the all-important Ralph Lauren trope, preppiness, are just a few of the themes he has mined over the decades. "What I do is make movies with my clothes. Movies via fashion."

Today, Lauren has chosen to come to the office he could comfortably have retired from a decade ago dressed in a melange of hiker, biker and cowboy: below a pale-purple down jacket he is sporting some fringed grey leather cowboy trousers and a pair of battered biker boots with a touch of tassel to them. This is not a uniform, though; he has happily appeared in public wearing head-to-toe Lauren-tailored tweed, matinee idol tuxedo jackets (teamed with jeans) and even a sarong. "I live different lives," he says, "but my product and myself, it’s the same thing… Anti-fashion fashion, whatever you want to call it, but something that’s meant to be timeless. Watch Cary Grant in To Catch a Thief tomorrow, next year, whenever – you would still want to be him at the end of it. And a woman will want to be Grace Kelly. That’s timeless."

Because so much of his currency depends on igniting fantasy, Lauren has never overly worried about reality. When he designed his first hit "safari" collection in 1983 he had never been to Africa – in fact he still hasn’t. As he learnt when he first came to England, reality can be a disappointment. Growing up in the Bronx in the 1950s he developed a fondness for the Anglo-influenced preppiness of Brooks Brothers, where he eventually worked. He wore a lot of tweed jackets – on the days when he wasn’t wearing army surplus. "So the first time I went to England [in the 1970s] I was upset. I thought I would see guys with moustaches in hacking jackets. Instead there were Italian suits everywhere and funny clothes in the windows. It was shocking. They thought the Italian stuff was better than what they had been wearing before. So I tried to bring back a lot of the clothes that people thought were old-fashioned and overlooked."

Now Ralph Lauren is thinking of England again, and not just the idealised vision he has become hooked on, Downton Abbey. "It is one of my great pleasures to watch that show. It is so beautiful. The writing is spectacular, the sets are fantastic and the clothes amazing. It’s like, 'Thank you, God, for this!'"

This month Lauren will land in London "for the first time in a long time" to attend a dinner for the Royal Marsden Hospital. It would be poor form to press Lauren for details – philanthropy is its own reward – yet it is fair to assume that the Marsden may be in line for some good news: Forbes magazine ranks Lauren as the 195th wealthiest person in the world, with an estimated $7 billion knocking about in his current account. And cancer care is a long-standing Lauren philanthropic focus. As well as endowing a research centre at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, and donating to American cancer care units, Lauren established one. It was set up 11 years ago in Harlem, after Lauren learnt of the low rates of diagnosis there, particularly among African Americans.

 He first became involved, he says, when Nina Hyde, a journalist friend of his at the Washington Post, told him she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. "I’d had a brain tumour just before I met her, and I felt a very strong connection." Lauren’s benign tumour was removed by surgery in April 1987, a few months after its detection. "We started Fashion Targets Breast Cancer in America," he continues. "And for some reason I thought I was going to be able to save her. Because I couldn’t believe that this woman, this alive woman that I was talking to was not going to be here. But she passed away."

It was during this early period of his cancer charity work that he met Diana, Princess of Wales – who was then the president of the Royal Marsden just as her elder son is now. Lauren has met many of his heroes down the years, and proudly escorts me to the en suite bathroom of his office where some of his most cherished trophies are hung: signed pictures from Frank Sinatra (complimenting Lauren on his "smashing" Polo ties), Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck and his all-time masculine idol, Cary Grant. Infinitely more respectfully, however, his picture with the Princess sits in a prime spot behind his desk.

"Time goes so fast I can’t even remember when I first met her. But it was during her troubled times, when she was coming to New York. We did this event for breast cancer. Later she presented me with an award in Washington. Once we met accidentally on a plane going to England and had a good conversation. And when I was in London we met at the Connaught for coffee. She had her lady-in-waiting with her, and I had my son with me. We were friendly in a nice way. And she was always shopping for Polo for her kids."

This uptown office, peppered with pictures of princesses and movie stars, is mere miles from the Bronx of Lauren’s extrovert, tweed-wearing youth, but the gulf between them is enormous. "It was a pretty tough neighbourhood. There was this area, Parkway, near all the schools, where we used to sit. Some guys liked what I wore and some didn’t. But I was just an individual, and a good athlete, so no one said anything to me. Anyway it wasn’t about the guys, it was about the girls."

Lauren’s mother, Fraydl, and father, Frank, had emigrated from Belarus. "My father, people say he was a house painter, but he wasn’t. He painted houses when he couldn’t get a job. But he was an artist. Life wasn’t easy with four children so he did what he had to do." Still, the family spent its summers in their small country place in Monticello, outside the city."It wasn’t much but I loved it," Lauren says. As well as sport and cinema, Lauren was always interested in clothes. He keenly recalls staring yearningly through a shop window at a pair of blue suede shoes when he was knee-high to a grasshopper. "Those blue suede shoes are every pair of shoes I ever desired."

After college, a stint at Brooks Brothers and time in the US Army Lauren went to work in 1964 as a tie salesman. Thinking back, Lauren is in full flow. "I had no credentials but I was dressed well. With my last money I’d bought some clothes from Brooks Brothers. And I sold those ties. There was this Englishman, I remember…" He pauses. "He used to come over from this company called, Vanners and Fennell? I don’t remember, it’s starting to slip away. [He remembered correctly, though.] Anyway, I loved the way he looked. He used to wear this beautiful scarf, very casually thrown away. He gave me that scarf and I still have it today."

Lauren’s success as a salesman and his observation that the Mod movement had hit a wall in America inspired him to think he could design some ties for himself that might just fill a niche. "So I asked the company if I could. They said, 'The world’s not ready for you, Ralph!'" Lauren left, found the manufacturer for the then très snob brand Sulka, and produced some three-and-a-half-inch-wide ties under the then-inconsequential brand name Polo. "I liked sports. Cricket was a name I liked, and rugby, which I use now. But I couldn’t call it baseball or basketball." Lauren’s ties, launched in 1967, took off. Soon he found a shirtmaker who could produce the collars he thought would best complement their shape. And then a suit manufacturer to complement the shirts. That suit manufacturer lent him $50,000 to start his company, and so Lauren has expanded ever since, mushrooming slowly from one collection to another.

In 1971, the year after being named America’s best menswear designer, Lauren produced his first collection of women’s clothes, a selection of mannish shirts in whose cuffs debuted the Polo-player logo that has since been embroidered on to tens of millions of garments. The Polo polo shirt, prepwear staple par excellence, was released in 1972. That filmic sensibility was requited by Woody Allen and Francis Ford Coppola when Lauren’s clothes made Diane Keaton look adorable in Annie Hall (1977), and Robert Redford devastatingly dashing in The Great Gatsby (1974). Lauren’s first store, which opened in 1971, was in Beverly Hills, and his designs for those films – and particularly for Keaton – helped define an easy tailored 1970s feminine look that is still influential today.

When Lauren designs it is via the "rig", a minutely detailed physical moodboard collated by Lauren’s team. During a trip to New York a few years ago I saw that season’s rig for RRL (my favourite Lauren collection, inspired by his ranch and all things Western, rugged and worn). There was a vast room with Winchesters and saloon doors on the wall, vintage Johnny Cash shirts by the dozen, cabinets full of belt buckles – a treasury of authentic, vintage raw material to act as a lightning rod for design inspiration. Another room, for his prime Purple tailoring collection, featured a painstakingly – and in retrospect awfully Downton-ish – recreation of an English manor house living room, complete with Persian carpet and fireplace. All of his collections get the same treatment. Which is why, he says, "I hardly ever sit at this desk. I am standing all day long because I work. Going from one office to another, always moving; menswear, womenswear, children’s, wherever I need to be."

Unsurprisingly for a man so immersed in the images he creates, his stores are immersive too. Bond Street, opened in 1984, has an ocean liner-inspired interior, while expats say the Paris flagship on the boulevard St Germain produces the best American food in the city. His ultimate store, though, is a few blocks away at 867 Madison Avenue – the Rhinelander mansion. This magnificent faux-gothic folly of a house was built for, but never inhabited by, a 19th-century heiress and fell into decline before Lauren bought the lease in 1983. He spent millions on its restoration, installed a gleaming wooden staircase modelled on that of the Connaught hotel in London, and turned its interior into the template Ralph Lauren environment, as dense with detail as those rigs.

In 2010 Lauren opened a new building opposite it, a neoclassical chateau made of Indiana limestone to house the women’s collections that complement the men’s in the Rhinelander. In 1997 Lauren took his company to Wall Street, offering 30 million shares at $24 apiece. Long-term investors have since profited: today the share price is around 12 times that, and after years of expansion under his chairmanship the "market capitalisation" of the company is estimated at $14 billion.

So, outside looking in, just as Ralph Lauren once stared at those blue suede shoes, he would seem to inhabit a landscape entirely unclouded by misfortune. Multiple landscapes, in fact. "I live those different lives, and am fortunate enough to have different homes. You wear different clothes in each environment, and live in a different way. Jamaica has the sun, and the beach, and is very colonial. My ranch out west is very cowboy, and that’s another dimension in my life. And the house on the beach in Montauk is very rustic."

These multiple lives have been shared with his wife, Ricky, his sons, Andrew and David, and daughter, Dylan. Campaign-perfect childhood pictures of them on the beach at Montauk, or on the porch of the family ranch in Colorado are all around us. Today Andrew is a film producer, and Dylan runs a four-chain sweetshop called Dylan’s Candy Bar that claims its 7,000-strong selection of lollipops and chocolate to be the largest in the world. Naturally, it sells clothes too. Only 42-year-old David is involved in the company founded by his father. As well as spearheading Lauren’s philanthropic foundation, David is a vice-president of the company and oversees its marketing around the world. He is married to Lauren Bush, the niece of George W. Today the children are a key catalyst for Lauren’s own continued curiosity and drive to innovate. "People are not as old as they were when my parents were old," he says. "My parents’ tastes did not affect me strongly, but with me and my children there is a total connection of life. Age today is not the same thing."

Lauren met his future wife, Ricky Loew-Beer, in 1964, thanks to a sore eye. "I went to the doctor, and there she was. She was the doctor’s assistant, and she kept coming into the room. I thought she was sort of paying attention to me." Lauren insists he was not in the habit of propositioning comely medical professionals: "No, no, no! This was one of those very rare things!" As for Ricky, once Lauren had asked her out on a date, she ran the suggestion by her boss. Entirely unethically, he cast his eye over Lauren’s medical records and family history, then deemed him a safe bet. Ricky and Ralph were married eight months later. Lauren was still at the very earliest stage of his empire-building but that doctor’s intuition proved correct. Today, the marriage is as solid as the Rhinelander and Ricky acts as muse to Ralph as well as family curator; two years ago she published a book of the recipes, photographs and watercolours she created during the children’s formative years summering in the Hamptons. Just as Lauren began by placing himself – and his own fantasised version of himself – at the heart of his work so the family and its six-strong portfolio of exotic properties has become a fashion Camelot-like cipher for the image of his products.

Even unvarnished, then, Lauren’s progress seems charmed. Yet there have, he says, "been lots of shakes along the way. Once or twice I thought I was going to lose my business. And you start to feel pain. That can be good for you, but you still don’t want it to happen." Lauren is a master of crafting idealised images with beautifully made clothes. Set in the context of his painstakingly designed stores these act as a prism for the fantasy lives of his customers. So when the occasional blemish sullies the lens of Lauren’s own image, it rather rankles.

When he was 16, Ralph and his elder brother, Jerry – who is also deeply involved in the company and helps oversee its menswear – elected to change their surname from Lifshitz, which Frank had brought from Belarus. They wanted something easier to live with. "As a kid, when other kids are laughing at your name you don’t want to raise your hand to it in class. You don’t want to have to carry something that is holding you down." Today the snarky sometimes use that name-change to suggest Lauren was airbrushing away his heritage: for a man who is particularly keen on "authenticity", this is annoying. "You know, in those days changing your name wasn’t seen as a denial of where you had come from," he says. "It was because you didn’t want to be made fun of. People came from Europe, and they Americanised their names. And my name had a tough spelling. I don’t know why it was spelt that way – there was a famous artist called Jacques Lifschutz – but anyway, that was the reason."

Another blot came far more recently. When Lauren unveiled his collegiate attire for Team USA at London 2012, most of it came labelled made in china, as at previous Games. This time, though, in an America sensitive to its position in the world and languishing in a sub-prime hangover, it was seized on. "I was battered by politics," Lauren says, "and in politics they suck you up and spit you out again. But I know about manufacturing, I try to make the best products I can, and I try to give my customers value." Lauren’s bemusement is fair enough, when you consider the provenance of most sportswear. "Look at Nike, look at all that stuff. But what happened happened, and I think it will always be a little stigma." For the closing ceremony the athletes wore the same designs, but this time American-made.

Lauren’s assistant curls her neck around the door and says his two o’clock is here – the day’s schedule is a packed one. "You know," he says as we drift towards the exit, "I built my company, and it still has my message. I’m here every day. So when you see the clothes come out you know they are Ralph Lauren…I try to stay tuned so that I don’t become yesterday’s news. You have to move and keep your mind open."

Still, after nearly 50 years in the saddle, doesn’t it all get a bit much? "It does takes its toll," Lauren concedes. "I used to be 6ft 3."

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren


[readon1 url="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/luxury/womens-style/32447/ralph-lauren-the-man-who-dresses-america.html"]Source:www.telegraph.co.uk [/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

amisteryThe world is filled with astonishing occurrences of coincidence and synchronicity that defy explanation. Are these incredible true stories of mere chance... or the hand of fate?

Finnish twin brothers, aged 71, were killed in identical bicycle accidents along the same road two hours apart, police said. "This is simply a historic coincidence. Although the road is a busy one, accidents don't occur every day," police officer Marja-Leena Huhtala told Reuters. "It made my hair stand on end when I heard the two were brothers, and identical twins at that. It came to mind that perhaps someone from upstairs had a say in this," she said.

Identical twins. Identical accidents. Identical deaths. Two hours apart. This astonishing coincidence was reported in newspapers and on newswires around the world in early March, 2002. The odds of it occurring seem remote in the extreme, and it causes one to wonder, as the woman did above - even for a moment - if there's more at play here than mere coincidence. Is it the hand of fate? Is it true, as author Elizabeth Kubler-Ross wrote, that "there are no mistakes, no coincidences. All events are blessings given to us to learn from."

History is full of amazing and sometimes bizarre coincidences that give us pause and keep us scratching our heads in wonder. Here is just a small sampling:

OTHER COINCIDENTAL DEATHS

This is a similar story of coincidence, not of twins but of two brothers. In 1975, while riding a moped in Bermuda, a man was accidentally struck and killed by a taxi. One year later, this man's bother was killed in the very same way. In fact, he was riding the very same moped. And to stretch the odds even further, he was struck by the very same taxi driven by the same driver - and even carrying the very same passenger! (Phenomena: A Book of Wonders, John Michell and Robert J. M. Rickard)

MYSTERIOUS MONK TO THE RESCUE

Joseph Aigner was a fairlly well-known portrait painter in 19th century Austria who, apparently, was quite an unhappy fellow: he several times attempted suicide. His first attempt was at the young age of 18 when he tried to hang himself, but was interrupted by the mysterious appearance of a Capuchin monk. At age 22 he again tried to hang himself, but was again saved from the act by the very same monk. Eight years later, his death was ordained by others who sentenced him to the gallows for his political activities. Once again, his life was saved by the intervention of the same monk. At age 68, Aiger finally succeeded in suicide, a pistol doing the trick. His funeral ceremony was conducted by the same Capuchin monk - a man whose name Aiger never even knew. (Ripley's Giant Book of Believe It or Not!)

WINNINGS' RIGHTFUL OWNER

In 1858, Robert Fallon was shot dead, an act of vengeance by those with whom he was playing poker. Fallon, they claimed, had won the $600 pot through cheating. With Fallon's seat empty and none of the other players willing to take the now-unlucky $600, they found a new player to take Fallon's place and staked him with the dead man's $600. By the time the police had arrived to investigate the killing, the new player had turned the $600 into $2,200 in winnings. The police demanded the original $600 to pass on to Fallon's next of kin - only to discover that the new player turned out to be Fallon's son, who had not seen his father in seven years! (Ripley's Giant Book of Believe It or Not!)

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

In the 1920s, three Englishman were traveling separately by train through Peru. At the time of their introduction, they were the only three men in the railroad car. Their introductions were more surprising than they could have imagined. One man's last name was Bingham, and the second man's last name was Powell. The third man announced that his last name was Bingham-Powell. None were related in any way. (Mysteries of the Unexplained)

IT'S RAINING BABIES

In Detroit sometime in the 1930s, a young (if incredibly careless) mother must have been eternally grateful to a man named Joseph Figlock. As Figlock was walking down the street, the mother's baby fell from a high window onto Figlock. The baby's fall was broken and both man and baby were unharmed. A stroke of luck on its own, but a year later, the very same baby fell from the very same window onto poor, unsuspecting Joseph Figlock as he was again passing beneath. And again, they both survived the event. (Mysteries of the Unexplained)

SWAPPED HOTEL FINDS

In 1953, television reporter Irv Kupcinet was in London to cover the coronation of Ellizabeth II. In one of the drawers in his room at the Savoy he found found some items that, by their identification, belonged to a man named Harry Hannin. Coincidentally, Harry Hannin - a basketball star with the famed Harlem Globetrotters - was a good friend of Kupcinet's. But the story has yet another twist. Just two days later, and before he could tell Hannin of his lucky discovery, Kupcinet received a letter from Hannin. In the letter, Hannin told Kucinet that while staying at the Hotel Meurice in Paris, he found in a drawer a tie - with Kupcinet's name on it! (Mysteries of the Unexplained)

PAGING MR. BRYSON

While on a business trip sometime in the late 1950s, Mr. George D. Bryson stopped and registered at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. After signing the register and being given his key to room 307, he stopped by the mail desk to see if any letters had arrived for him. Indeed there was a letter, the mail girl told him, and handed him an envelope addressed to Mr. George D. Bryson, room 307. This wouldn't be so odd accept the letter was not for him, but for room 307's just-previous occupant - another man named George D. Bryson. (Incredible Coincidence, Alan Vaughan)

TWIN BOYS, TWIN LIVES

The stories of identical twins' nearly identical lives are often astonishing, but perhaps none more so than those of identical twins born in Ohio. The twin boys were separated at birth, being adopted by different families. Unknown to each other, both families named the boys James. And here the coincidences just begin. Both James grew up not even knowing of the other, yet both sought law-enforcement training, both had abilities in mechanical drawing and carpentry, and each had married women named Linda. They both had sons whom one named James Alan and the other named James Allan. The twin brothers also divorced their wives and married other women - both named Betty. And they both owned dogs which they named Toy. Forty years after their childhood separation, the two men were reunited to share their amazingly similar lives. (Reader's Digest, January 1980)

THE VENGEFUL BULLET

Henry Ziegland thought he had dodged fate. In 1883, he broke off a relationship with his girlfriend who, out of distress, committed suicide. The girl's brother was so enraged that he hunted down Ziegland and shot him. The brother, believing he had killed Ziegland, then turned his gun on himself and took his own life. But Ziegland had not been killed. The bullet, in fact, had only grazed his face and then lodged in a tree. Ziegland surely thought himself a lucky man. Some years later, however, Ziegland decided to cut down the large tree, which still had the bullet in it. The task seemed so formidable that he decided to blow it up with a few sticks of dynamite. The explosion propelled the bullet into Ziegland's head, killing him. (Ripley's Believe It or Not!)

CHILDHOOD RETURNED

While American novelist Anne Parrish was browsing bookstores in Paris in the 1920s, she came upon a book that was one of her childhood favorites - Jack Frost and Other Stories. She picked up the old book and showed it to her husband, telling him of the book she fondly remembered as a child. Her husband took the book, opened it, and on the flyleaf found the inscription: "Anne Parrish, 209 N. Weber Street, Colorado Springs." It was Anne's very own book. (While Rome Burns, Alexander Wollcott)

AND FINALLY, TWO MORE TWINS

John and Arthur Mowforth were twins who lived about 80 miles apart in Great Britain. On the evening of May 22, 1975, both fell severely ill from chest pains. The families of both men were completely unaware of the other's illness. Both men were rushed to separate hospitals at approximately the same time. And both died of heart attacks shortly after arrival. (Chronogenetics: The Inheretance of Biological Time, Luigi Gedda and Gianni Brenci)

[readon1 url="http://paranormal.about.com/od/humanenigmas/a/Amazing-Coincidences.htm"]Source:paranormal.about.com[/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

chicofbIn just a few days the video he shot in Monteón and Sayulita received more than 70 thousand “Likes” on Facebook.

The recently activated Facebook campaign titled “Around Mexico with Messenger” consists of following a 19-year-old youth around the country and publishing videos and pictures of the places he’s visited—now including the Riviera Nayarit.
 
Using the hashtag #chicoprovinciano, Cris Núñez is sparking social media sensation, receiving online recommendations on places to visit and things to do.
 
During his visit to the Riviera Nayarit he stopped at Playa Canalán in Monteón, as well as Playa los Muertos and Patzcuaritos in Sayulita, where he learned how to surf.
 
“I would say Sayulita is a magical place,” he said during his 2:08-long video. “I learned how powerful it is to meet people who will let you do what you want to do. It was amazing.”
 
The intention is for Facebook users to keep in contact with Cris and to continue to repost his videos. On February 4th he published his Riviera Nayarit video, which in less than a week garnered over 70 thousand “Likes.”
 
This campaign was launched in Mexico, thanks to the very active Facebook participation of its citizens, who on a daily basis number some 30 million users around the country.
 
Cris was chosen after a long search for the ideal representative for the project, even though he had never left Guanajuato, where he’s been living since he was three years old.
 
The trip began on January 28th and so far he’s visited San Miguel de Allende, El Oro de Hidalgo, Mexico City, Tulúm and the Riviera Nayarit.
 
Click here to see the video: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=617640174958438

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

puerto-vallarta-airport-panorama

With the presence of important panelists who will address issues on the growth of airport infrastructure, from 11 to 13 November, Puerto Vallarta will host the XXI Annual General Meeting Airports Council International-Latin America and the Caribbean (ACI-LAC ) event to be held at the Sheraton Buganvilias.

The Pacific Airport Group (GAP) through the International Airport of Puerto Vallarta, will host the 21st General Assembly of ACI-LAC, an event where they will discuss various topics that are related to the growth of this important sector in the country.

The event will be held from 11 to 13 November at the Hotel Sheraton Buganvilias, which will feature panelists Tewart important Steevens, CEO of Nassau Airport, Bahamas, Arthur J. Tomo, American Airlines Vice President Latin America & Caribbean, among others.

It is expected that this year's Assembly has the support of the governor of Jalisco, Emilio Gonzalez Marquez, as well as state and federal authorities, and that the opening ceremony would be on Sunday November 11th at 5:30 o'clock pm in the exhibition area of the host hotel.

On Monday, at 8:45 am, we have scheduled a formal event, where he has seen the participation of Eduardo Sanchez Navarro, Chairman of GAP, Fredrick Piccolo, vice president of ACI World, Philippe Barl, president of ACI-LAC, and Mohino Fernando Bosque, CEO of GAP.

[readon1 url="http://www.vallartatoday.com"]Source:www.vallartatoday.com - Translation by Suyapa Ajuria Nov. 10, 2012[/readon1]

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

metThat Celestial rock had been zooming along at 40,000 mph for thousands of years when it exploded over Russia on Friday — and that’s when it really picked up speed.

The first big meteorite of the media age rocketed through the consciousness of its target planet at the speed of Twitter. A rare event in a remote place went viral, thanks to the ubiquitous dashboard cameras of bad Russian drivers. And it instantly grabbed the attention of an electronic age that thought it was beyond being stunned by a bolt from space.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

braslArticles inspired by the most recent FAM trip are just starting to appear in six of Brazil’s most important media dedicated to tourism, luxury, nature and travel. Together they’ve already generated over one and half million impressions.

Brazil is a very important potential market for the Riviera Nayarit because of its high purchasing power in the tourism segment. With this in mind, the Riviera Nayarit Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) took the opportunity to invite top members of its press to enjoy the Mexico Cup Regatta as part of a FAM trip.

On the list were six of the most important media dedicated to tourism, luxury nature and travel in Brazil: Revista L’Officiel, Revista Isto é Platinum, Blog Falando de Viagem, Revista Joyce Pascowitch, IG and Revista Nova.

The trip, which took place mid-March, is already displaying results and placing the Riviera Nayarit as Mexico’s newest luxury destination. The media has been already been broadcasting details on accommodations, the Marietas Islands, Sayulita, San Pacho, Bucerías, Punta de Mita, Nuevo Vallarta and La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. They've also alluded to the many celebrities that have visited the region, among other details.

Including the press runs, unique visitors to webpages plus blog and social media followers, the sum total of the impressions received is over a million and a half impressions—indeed very favorable exposure for the Riviera Nayarit. And this is with a single publication from each of the different media.

One of the first to publish about the Riviera Nayarit was IG, with more than 90 thousand visitors per month; Falando de Viagen alone offers more than half a million impressions among its many distribution channels.

The journalists reviewed every aspect of the tourism services offered by Mexico’s Pacific Treasure, from swimming with the dolphins to enjoying the unique culinary delights of this region and relaxing at the Spa.

The various promotional, marketing and public relations strategies implemented by the Riviera Nayarit CVB all have the same objective, one that is fast becoming a reality: to place the Riviera Nayarit as Mexico’s newest luxury destination.

Click here to enjoy the articles in their original language:
http://luxo.ig.com.br/lazereprazer/2014-03-28/riviera-nayarit-e-o-novo-destino-de-luxo-do-mexico.html.
http://www.mercadoeeventos.com.br/site/noticias/view/103356/riviera-nayarit-define-comercializacao-de-pacotes-com-6-operadoras.