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New Wave Of Covid-19 Infection Warned

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Nightmare; the new variant


The COVID-19 virus continues to mutate and more than two years after its emergence, the XBB variant, also known as 'Nightmare', has unleashed symptoms such as cough, sore throat, fatigue, malaise, diarrhea, runny nose and more.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) warned that a new wave of contagions, derived from the Omicron strain of COVID-19, could soon appear.

"Viruses and pathogens are constantly trying to adapt and escape the immunological pressure we put on them," Albert Ko, Ph.D., a physician and epidemiologist at the Yale School of Public Health, told The New York Times.

The European Center for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) announced the arrival of the BQ.1.1 and BQ.1 variant of COVID-19, better known as Hellhound.

However, there is now talk of another variant called XBB, considered as Nightmare by some medical reports.

Several specialists informed that the outbreak started in the world since the second half of October, and warned the population about maintaining the measures to prevent contagion.

The Nightmare variant alerts the population

The outbreak of XBB or Nightmare occurred in Singapore more than a month ago, although it then spread rapidly throughout Asia and some countries of the European Union.

It is known as Nightmare because experts believe it shows greater resistance to antibodies than other variants.

The name also comes from Gryphon, which translates as griffin, referring to the mythological creature with the body of a lion, wings and head of an eagle.

Doctors have asked to be alert to the symptoms generated by the Nightmare variant, which are not very different from the rest. Cough, sore throat, fatigue, general malaise, diarrhea, congestion, runny nose, headache, fever, muscle aches, loss of smell and taste, are the frequent ailments of an infected person.

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